Tag Archives: Construction

8 REASONS WHY THIS IS A GREAT PROGRESS PHOTOGRAPH!

You work hard to build something to exacting standards that is solid and long-lasting.

So do I:

I’m known for producing high quality and creative job site photographs.  My approach is much more than just taking pictures with a smart device. As great as smart devices are they cannot compete with the challenging light, color and contrast issues inherent on a job site. I build photographs with a professional approach. To exacting standards. Solid. Long-lasting.

This Photograph is Very Good

I want clients to know the why behind my work. Why the time of day matters, why the lens matters, why the file format matters and why the editing process matters. The techniques I’ve refined over the years contribute to successfully building project photographs.

Here’s why:

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THE BIG TWO OF TIME-LAPSE FILM PRODUCTION

Be it indoors or out, demolition, grading or construction, when I’m hired to produce your time lapse film, there are two things on my mind: data collection and data management.

Granted there are four sub-sections inside the two and that’s the purpose of this article, to flesh out exactly what needs to happen to do it right:

1)     Fixed Camera
2)    Aerial Video
3)    Rover Days
4)    Post-Production

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The Marriage of Stills and Motion

A cinemagraph is the marriage of a single still photograph and either a real time video or a time-lapse video.

Or both…

The technique of combining still photography with a motion clip to create engaging visual treats has been around for several years. Since I first discovered this amazing trick I’ve been looking or the appropriate time and place to produce my first one:


Press the play button to see it again and again and again…

The story behind this is simple: working with my client, we decided to end the first part of what we hope to be a 2.5 year time-lapse film with a simple yet elegant group portrait of the heavy equipment operators in their employ. While shooting this epic group portrait, (one of my specialties) I had an epiphany: this was the time and place for my first cinemagraph.

And so it went. After the photography session, I took the file into post-production to tone colors, add a cloudy sky, add an employee who was photographed separately and finally, added the company logo and date of operations:

time lapse group construction portrait

A look at what the camera records, (left) and the artists application of his vision afterwards. (right)

And just like that, my client has the perfect ending to the first chapter of their time-lapse construction film. Note: the cloudy skies in the still photograph above were used specifically for the framed prints given to each person in the photograph. The cloudy sky motion clips blended together in the cinemagraph had a different look and feel.

I’m planning on adding cinemagraphs to future time-lapse construction films.

Will yours be next?

Thanks for reading.

Michael

It’s Magic When Things Move

It’s the motion that makes me do what I do. As anyone who reads my blog…(both of you, where ever you are, thanks!), you know that after 31 years as a still photographer, I switched to time lapse in 2011. It’s what I specialize in now and as part of that specialization, motion control is a huge part of what I do for you. Done while in the field during principal photography, (but sometimes or in addition to), motion control can also be done in post production:

password: post-effects

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Rebar

The definition of cool under fire, this is one quality you definitely want your professional photographer to possess when commissioning a time lapse project. Especially if your project is located at a construction site with heavy equipment moving about. Safety first is crucial of course but the dynamic nature of medium and large scale construction sites guarantee that unexpected opportunities arise and as a time lapse specialist who spends a lot of time on site, I’m present to time lapse those unexpected moments, danger notwithstanding.

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