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Tag Archives: Michael E. Stern

Hometown Pasadena Interview

Thank you Kat Ward and Hometown Pasadena…

POLB

Interview with Michael e. Stern, local time lapse expert.

It’s The Little Things…

Partner With Good Products

Trying something new here…my first video promo/post where I’m discussing the merits of the eMotimo TB3 motion control unit.

Hope you find it useful:

Thanks for watching.

Michael

The Fabulous Forum

August 27, 2013. I was on my 10th assignment for the Madison Square Company in New York. As the renovation of the Fabulous Forum proceeds, my archive is contains over 1500 images and with each new shoot, continues to grow. Here’s my gallery of 39 (so far) select images.

I love documentary photography because of the way historical photography instantly transports me to a place and time much like a favorite song does. Creating the historical record of what’s taking place at this storied venue will be important for future Los Angelenos and scholars. and it’s a lot of fun for me now. My client has mentioned more than once how much she appreciates my devotion to the project. No worries!

I grew up watching the Lakers, Kings and the circus at the Forum. Usually with my dad. Just he and I. As he’s been gone several years now, this assignment takes on more meaning each time I venture through the place documenting it’s current state. It saddens and thrills me simultaneously. Kinda weird. But oh so much fun.

Here’s my equipment-light location package:

time lapse photography package
Everything I need is in the box: tripod, speedlight, cameras, lenses, water, food, towels, flare shield and an iPad. (I look at previous shoots to match up camera positions for shoot-to-shoot consistency)

iPad on location at the Fabulous ForumI ain’t no spring chicken anymore and with all the walking up and down narrow passages, traipsing all over and around various construction detritus and equipment, it pays to be as nimble as possible.

Each time I set foot on the property I’m obligated to wear steel-toed boots, an orange vest, safety glasses and a hard hat: Michael e. Stern in saftey gearI bought a Lil Mule camera dolly for the express purpose of moving my camera in random, controlled patterns. Here’s what it looks like:

lil mule time lapse michael sternIt’s sweet. I’m glad I made the investment in one. Here’s my first test with it prior to taking out to the Forum.

How’s that for fun? Footage from the Forum to follow….

Thanks for reading.

 

Michael

 

Related Images:

Time Lapse Compositions

Space Shuttle Endeavor spends time in Inglewood, CA.

As a still photographer first and a relative newcomer to time lapse stories second, I needed to reaffirm and embrace my core strength: composition and framing. Where I set my camera is an important first step when building one photograph at a time. As I’ve transitioned to time lapse short films and stories, it has become more important to think about framing and composition when exposing 1,000’s of frames. Moving a camera during a time lapse sequence makes it crucial to think about as many compositional relationships and framing issues as one can. If it’s in the shot it’s going to be recorded.

You have to decide if the elements in question are distracting from or contributing to the story. It’s up to you to make this determination. It’s what helps to refine a recognizable style. It’s a process of learning how you respond to a situation, what your vision is going forward from that point to the end of the project. A lot of time lapse filming is not set and forget…

Sometimes of course you have what you have at a scene and you do the best you can but when the opportunity presents itself, take advantage of it. Preview the shot and move items out of the frame that get in the way. On top of all your technique and process, is a story that needs telling, If this story is not evident to your audience, you’ve failed the mission….

I should follow my own advice. This short story would have been better if I had removed the sports items against the house and styled the drapes seen from the MRKII camera position. I was caught up in 3 camera placements, 3 interval settings and in 3 points of view. And missed it. I didn’t think about the peripheral elements in all 3 compositions as I should have, just the T2i, (panning) and 5D, (downward angle) POV’s. My bad. Fortunately most of the usable footage came from the panning camera.

I wanted to repeat a camera move over time, blend the footage together in post. I figured this would facilitate moving the story along with a seamless and smooth feeling to it. For me it’s about the emotional response you get from watching my stories, this is nothing new by any stretch but is it worth remembering…..

FYI the device I used for this particular story was the Syrp Genie

Happy 4th.

Michael

Camera 2 Camera Expo June 28-30, 2013 in Vegas!

 

Camera2Camera

Camera 2 Camera Expo…Come On Down!

I was invited to participate at next weeks brand new camera expo in Vegas. I’m putting on a 3-day time lapse workshop and a 90 minute Lightroom Develop Tips demonstration.

I’m bringing a Syrp Genie, an eMotiomo TB3, a Dynamic Perception Stage 0 Dolly, a Meade Instruments telescope pan and tilt head, a Promote Systems Controller amongst other gear that will be available for participants to handle and try out. Under expert supervision of course…  : )

I’ve been shooting a lot of content to show and all participants will have access to the gear.

We’ll be going out to a dry lake bed for an early morning shoot, to the Bellagio for an afternoon shoot and to the roof of the South Point Hotel Casino & Spa for our evening shoot. Afterwards will be working with Lightroom and Premiere to put our sequences together.

Participants are encouraged to bring their own gear but not to worry if you don’t have it all. I do.

This will be fun. I guarantee it.

The second program is about ways to use the Lightroom Develop Module to pull the moment out of your photograph. Called Fantastic Toning Tips, I’ll walk you through the must do’s that I follow plus a boatload of ways to add punch, drama and visual effects to one image or an entire time lapse sequence. (see above)

Hope to see some of you there!

Michael

I’m A Picture Maker, Not A Picture Taker

This is a photograph of how the subject appears during the time of day I prefer to work:

Machi-ai-1

I made a number of additional exposures while on the scene. I integrate a secondary light into the scene during these additional exposures. All 50 of ’em. They’re toned and cropped in Lightroom, exported to Bridge for assessment of order and then assembled in Photoshop where the finishing touches are applied.

Here’s the photograph I built:

Machi-ai

From cradle to grave in under 3 hours…..

Here are two more examples:

Garfield Heights Landmark District Photos

Interior photographs of the recording studio and control rooms.

A video of me in action.

Each exposure in this process is a light switch. This switch can be on or off. Made lighter or darker. Crisp or fuzzy. I have other things I can do with these “switches” but a fella shouldn’t tell all his secrets should he?

A successful photograph is a series of small decisions made correctly. It’s that simple. Especially after 10,000 hours of practice. I build photographs, I do not take pictures.

I can look at a scene and overlay a lighting paradigm:  the lighting angles, the contrast ratios, the color relationships and the brightness range. I commit this to memory and off I go. The camera is locked in place, I move around the subject with my trusty little light and in true “painting with light” fashion, I sculpt the final composition. This is part one.

Part two is all about alining the files so they share camera calibration, lens profile and white balance characteristics. Then more fun. Cropping for impact and toning for beauty.

Part three is when I assemble the elements into a cohesive whole. My average is 25 layers per man-made scene.

This technique isn’t new. It doesn’t break new ground. This is however my favorite technique because it offers many visual choices, demands improvisation and also provides a level of control that meshes perfectly with todays technology.

Thanks for reading

Michael

Remnants on Display

 

Next week I’ll be attending the opening of a group show that I’m part of at the offices of IDA in Culver City, CA. The show opens April 19 at 6pm. Stop by if you’re in the area and we’ll have a toast:

8440 Warner Drive, Suite A1
Culver City, CA 90232
310-581-4400

3 pieces were selected and I of course am thrilled at seeing my personal art form on public display. This isn’t the first public showing I’ve had for Remnants but it will be the most visible.

IDA is a busy design studio with many people moving in and out during the week and I look forward to connecting with folks who are attracted to my particular vision.

It doesn’t stop there either. I have a book out on the subject and maybe I’ll make a sale or two….

All in all a part of any artists’ plan should be to get the work out and have it seen by as large an audience as possible.

The journey continues…

Michael

The Time Lapse Narrative: Chapter 2 The Landscape Process v4

Adobe Premiere Editing Workspace

Adobe Premiere Editing Workspace

Well it took long enough didn’t it? Chapter 2 of my time lapse saga at The Huntington was published a few weeks ago. The feedback from my client, friends and colleagues has been 100% positive.

I’m grateful for the response and of course was hoping for exactly that but one never knows…

The months I spent becoming familiar with the material I recorded, (stills, video and sound) sourcing out music for the soundtrack, learning Adobe Premiere and the principle3s of strong editing have all been worth the effort.

I will write again about the 7 things I have learned that make up a time lapse narrative film.

I recommend a small popcorn as this is  4:21 in length.

Until the my next post…enjoy the show.

Michael

Your Intellectual Property Rights!

time-lapse sequence of re-assembly of Japanese Tea House

There’s been an interesting discussion lately on Linked In about quoting prices for selling copyrights to another party. People have different ideas about what that should cost and what it practically means to you as an artist when selling your claim of authorship. I’ve been working on a blog post covering how to sell the idea of intellectual property rights transfers to your clients but it’s not ready for prime time. In the meantime I will be appearing on a panel next week that discusses how to make money from licensing your intellectual property rights and how to sell the idea to your markets…

This live webinar will be recorded for later playback. In addition to myself, Jason Horejs from Xanadu Gallery in Scottsdale AZ, and entertainment law attorneys Todd and Jeff  Brabec fill out this interesting and dynamic panel. More information and sign up is here.

Hope to see you on the broadcast with your questions…and our answers.

This program is being put on by the Copyright Alliance, an organization I proudly support.
Michael